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Pradaxa Gastrointestinal Bleeding Lawsuit

Pradaxa Gastrointestinal Bleeding Lawsuit

Pradaxa (dabigatran) has been linked to a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, also known as GI bleeding. This risk may be greatest for older people who have impaired kidney function, especially elderly women. Pradaxa can cause spontaneous bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Because Pradaxa is a blood-thinner, it may be difficult or impossible for a doctor to reverse the anti-clotting effects of this drug and save a person from bleeding to death.

What You Can Do & How a Lawsuit Can Help

The Schmidt Firm, PLLC is currently accepting Pradaxa injury cases in all 50 states. If you or somebody you know was injured by severe bleeding, you should contact our lawyers immediately for a free case consultation. Please use the form below to contact our Defective Drug Litigation Group or call us toll-free 24 hours a day at (866) 920-0753.

Pradaxa Overview

Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a new type of blood-thinning medication that was invented by the drug company Boehringer Ingelheim. When it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010, it was hailed as a long-awaited alternative to the blood-thinner warfarin. Warfarin is notoriously problematic because it requires blood testing to adjust dosage, and has a risk of bleeding.

Boehringer Ingelheim has recently created a registry of more than 56,000 people who have atrial fibrillation. The goal of the registry is to better understand the safety and effectiveness of the long-term use of blood-thinning medications. The study will monitor patients who use warfarin, Pradaxa, Xarelto, and aspirin to prevent strokes that are caused by atrial fibrillation.

Pradaxa and Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Pradaxa gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most common side effects of this medication, and it is frequently life-threatening. This is because Pradaxa is a blood-thinner, and minor bleeds may be uncontrollable because the body is unable to form a blood clot.

A study published in 2010 in the Annals of Pharmacology detailed the case of a 66 year-old woman who used Pradaxa every day for two months. She suffered from serious Pradaxa gastrointestinal bleeding, and was in the hospital for the next 47 days. She was then admitted to a nursing home, where she died two months later.

A new study has found that elderly women may be most susceptible to Pradaxa bleeding. One woman in the study died from serious GI bleeding after using Pradaxa.

Unlike warfarin, Pradaxa has no efficient reversal mechanism to stop its blood-thinning effects in the event of an emergency. This means that when a patient presents at the hospital with severe Pradaxa GI bleeding, a doctor may not be able to stop the anti-clotting effects of Pradaxa. The only way to remove Pradaxa from the bloodstream is with dialysis, which can take several hours. By the time dialysis takes effect, a patient may suffer serious, life-threatening blood loss.

What is Gastrointestinal Bleeding?

Gastrointestinal bleeding, or GI bleeding, is a spontaneous internal bleeding that occurs anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The upper gastrointestinal tract includes the esophagus, the stomach, and the first part of the small intestine. The lower gastrointestinal tract includes most of the small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus.

Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in 50-150 people per 100,000 adults every year. It has a high rate of mortality. One study in the UK from 2007 found that 7% of people who were admitted to the hospital with acute gastrointestinal bleeding died from the condition.

Part of the difficulty of treating gastrointestinal bleeding is that it can be very difficult for a physician to locate the source of the bleed. Even when the source is located, it can be difficult to stop the bleeding because the site is difficult to access. People who are taking blood-thinners are especially difficult to treat, because these blood-thinning medications inhibit clotting that is necessary to stop life-threatening bleeding.

Signs & Symptoms of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

Gastrointestinal bleeding can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, from the esophagus and stomach, to the intestines and rectum. The symptoms of GI bleeding vary depending on the source of the bleeding. Typically, blood will appear in stools. The brighter red the blood, the closer the bleed is to the anus.

Symptoms of Pradaxa gastrointestinal bleeding may include:

  • Dark, tarry stools
  • Blood in the stools
  • Large amounts of blood passing from the rectum
  • Small amounts of blood on toilet paper, in the toilet bowl, or on stools
  • Vomiting blood
  • Vomiting material that looks like coffee grounds
  • Low blood count
  • Anemia

Do I have a Pradaxa Lawsuit?

The Schmidt Firm, PLLC is currently accepting Pradaxa injury cases in all 50 states. If you or somebody you know was injured by severe bleeding, you should contact our lawyers immediately for a free case consultation. Please use the form below to contact our Defective Drug Litigation Group or call us toll-free 24 hours a day at (866) 920-0753.

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