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What is a Modular-Neck Hip Implant?

What is a Modular-Neck Hip Implant?

Modular-neck hip implants are designed with an interchangeable femoral neck, which includes a metal-on-metal component. Unfortunately, this component may be prone to fretting, corrosion, and accumulation of metal debris in the body. Stryker has recently recalled two modular-neck hip implants — the Rejuvenate and ABG II — and U.S. Attorneys are investigating the Wright ProFemur modular-neck hip implant for similar defects.

What You Can Do & How a Hip Implant Lawsuit Can Help

The Schmidt Firm, PLLC is currently accepting hip implant induced injury cases in all 50 states. If you or somebody you know has been injured by a hip implant, you should contact our lawyers immediately for a free case consultation. Please use the form below to contact our Defective Medical Device Litigation Group or call us toll-free 24 hours a day at (866) 920-0753.

What is a Modular-Neck Hip Implant?

A modular-neck hip implant is a type of hip replacement that has an interchangeable femoral neck (the part between the femoral stem and the head). This allows a surgeon to fit different-sized components to custom fit the device to match each patient’s unique anatomy.

You may have heard about the recent hip implant recalls involving metal-on-metal hip implants. The problem with the metal-on-metal design is that metal ball-and-socket can grind together and shed particles of chromium and cobalt into the body. Metal debris can irritate tissues and bone and cause pain, swelling, and other severe complications.

At first, it doesn’t make sense that a modular-neck hip implant could have the same defect as metal-on-metal hip implants. However, modular-neck hip implants do a have a metal-on-metal component — the junction of the femoral stem and the femoral neck. Like other metal-on-metal hip implants, the modular-neck design can shed metal debris into the body and cause severe side effects.

Types of Modular-Neck Hip Implants

Stryker Recalls Rejuvenate, ABG II Hip Implant

On July 6, 2012, after less than two years on the market, Stryker recalled the Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck hip implants due to “excessive metal debris and/or ion generation” and “fretting and/or corrosion at or about the modular neck junction.” The FDA had received more than 60 adverse event reports from people who suffered from severe metal poisoning, tissue damage, or other complications, and required revision surgery.

Stryker recommended patients who have the Rejuvenate or ABG II to consult their physician and undergo a medical evaluation. If the hip implant is causing chronic pain, the patient should have blood tests to check for high metal ions in the bloodstream.

Revision surgery for a hip implant stem is very difficult, because the femoral stem is driven into the patient’s femur. Removing this device from the femur can be very traumatic and there is a risk of fracture. Re-implanting another device into the femur is also very traumatic for the patient. Revision surgery for this type of implant is painful, debilitating, expensive, and time-consuming.

U.S. Attorneys Investigating Wright ProFemur Hip Implant

The U.S. Attorneys in Tennessee have issued a subpoena to Wright Medical Technology for “records and documents” related to the Wright ProFemur modular-neck hip implant. Although the ProFemur has a very similar design to the recalled Stryker hip implants, the Wright ProFemur has not been recalled.

In Securities filings, Wright disclosed that they were under investigation, but claims that the ProFemur does not have the same design defect as the Stryker hip implants.

However, when the FDA approved the Stryker hip implants, Stryker avoided conducting safety studies by claiming that their product was “substantially equivalent” to the Wright ProFemur. Under the FDA’s 510(k) approval system, new devices that are similar to existing devices do not need to conduct safety tests. Unfortunately, “similar” products are not always safe — and defects are often not discovered until the product has been implanted in thousands of people.

Hip Implant Side Effects

Do I have a Hip Implant Lawsuit?

The Schmidt Firm, PLLC is currently accepting hip implant induced injury cases in all 50 states. If you or somebody you know has been injured by a hip implant, you should contact our lawyers immediately for a free case consultation. Please use the form below to contact our Defective Medical Device Litigation Group or call toll free 24 hours a day at (866) 920-0753.

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